Size Doesn’t Matter, It’s How You Use It

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My kids believe love and friendship can only be measured through the quantity of stuff. Specifically, comparing who has more. The more you have, the better you are. If you have more than your sibling, you win. I don’t know what you win, but you win. When the kids fight over toys I always tell them to play with what they have. Get creative. Have fun. Stop worrying about what you don’t have and do something with what you do have.

Never is this more true than in marketing and sales. From marketing I hear “We want more form submissions. We need more engagement.” From sales I hear “We need more leads. We want more leads. Did I mention we need more leads?” Sales is often plagued with the difficult task of cold calling. In truth, if marketing is performing, than cold calling should be eliminated. With the emergence of marketing automation, marketing analytics, and sales enablement the focus on quantity should diminish and the obsession with quality digital data should surge.

As I investigate engagement and lead activity what I find is that we focus so much on the size and quantity of activity we often neglect the information that can be derived. Many times leads are generated but insufficient follow up occurs. Sure, a call is made but we don’t always capture the reasons a lead progresses through, or falls, out of the funnel. Instead of flowing them into a nurture campaign, segmented for their buy cycle phase, we disqualify them if they’re not ready to buy.

We generate interest or opportunity but we don’t always investigate the path the prospect took to get to the opportunity phase. What content did they engage with? What digital body language have we captured? What pain points have they defined in this digital body language? What more do we now understand about the prospect and company? More importantly, what are we doing with that data?

Does sales now have the ability to transition from cold calls to warm calls? Can sales engage in a Challenger style buy cycle? Does marketing understand what content resonates and what misses the mark? Have new content opportunities been defined? Can marketing and sales better define what the buy cycle looks like, what questions are asked and answered, and what content is applicable through these phases?

While we all strive for increased engagement and high lead conversion, it’s important not to overlook the data you’ve captured that can contribute to these goals. In the end, size doesn’t matter, it’s how you use it.

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Marilyn Cox

Marilyn Cox is the Director of Marketing for Second City Works - the B2B division of the famed Second City.

You know the buzzwords; inbound, outbound, content, demand gen, lead gen, martech, social media, account-based, advocacy, customer success, sales enablement, and analytics.She studies it, plans it, executes it, experiments with it, and loves it.

Through discovery, creation, and innovation she's learned to say "Yes, And".Like business, her career is one big improvisational act.

She leads all aspects of the brand and culture, developing and executing a clearly defined, integrated marketing communications strategy.Marilyn is responsible for planning, organizing, staffing, training, and managing all marketing functions to achieve objectives of growth, awareness, customer success and making work better.

Marilyn exists to empower sales and support the customer. When not geeking out over marketing analytics, she can be found daydreaming about her unrealized dream as a professional wrestler with the WWE.
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One Response to "Size Doesn’t Matter, It’s How You Use It"
  1. Spot on. One of the biggest challenges I have always faced is interpreting the right data the right way with clients and execs. Too often the focus is on more, more more! and not the full life cycle of what is happening, where, and why.

    Cheers,
    BH

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